A day in the life


It started with a delivery from “Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm.”  A bright green bag filled with peat moss and 500 lively red worms.

I gathered my 23 ten year olds around me, and opened the big pink compost box in our classroom.  “See,” I told them, pointing with my trowel. “These apple cores are sitting on top of the soil.  That isn’t going to allow them to be composted.”  This comment was greeted by a cloud of fruit flies, zooming up from the box. I tried to brush them away from my face, and ended up getting compost in my left eye.  Blinking furiously, (well, winking furiously, to be more accurate), I explained the need to always cover our fruit and veggie parts with soil before closing the box.  But before I could finish, the giant knot of worms that was lying on the soil in front of me decided to react to the bright lights of the classroom.

The result was a huge wriggling mass of desperate worms, climbing and writhing over each other  in a panicked attempt to dig into the damp black soil beneath them.

Cries of “EEEEEEEEEWWWWWWW!”  and “Awesome!!!” filled the air, and the idea of teaching anything for the next twenty minutes was immediately abandoned.

As the day went on, things only got more interesting.  I was fighting a creeping case of laryngitis, and was trying hard to preserve my voice. This proved to be harder than usual, given the fact that we had six tanks of guppies, snails, elodea and daphnia sitting under the grow lights on our counter. One of the fish went belly up, and was floating around in his tank.

And there we went again.

“EEEEEEEEEWWWWWWW!”  and “Awesome!!!” in equal measure. Followed by “You’re gross!” “You’re a wimp!” and “Get him out of there!” and “Let’s see if the other fish eat him!”

I croaked and squeaked and finally restored order.  And flushed the dead guy down the drain.

The day went on, with the usual math lessons, recess, reading, spelling and lunch.  Finally it was time for our end of the day meeting.

“Can I turn over the compost?”, one little boy asked.  “No”, I told him. “We got everything all covered up nicely.”   He squirmed a little bit. “Well, yeah,” he said, looking up at me with big blue eyes. “But we sorta dug up the worms a while ago.  You know,” he shrugged, “We wanted to see them all squirm around again.”

I sighed. “Sure.  Go bury the worms and the apple cores.”  He looked at his buddy, who had hopped up to help him.

“This is the best day ever!” my worm loving young friend enthused. “Dead fish and a huge pile of worm poop!”

Yep.

My life is one endless string of highbrow events.

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3 responses to this post.

  1. You make teaching the little kids in your classroom sound soooooo much fun. When I grow up I hope to be one.

    No, not teacher — little kid in your classroom!

    😛

    Reply

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